Category Archive: Resident News to Use

Meet New ABPM Executive Director, Dr. James Stavosky

James Stavosky, DPM

James Stavosky, DPM

“Enjoy what you do every day. Be quick to listen, and slow to talk and anger.” These are the words that Dr. James Stavosky, the new Executive Director of ABPM, lives by. He enjoys golfing, fly-fishing and playing tennis with his two sons and his wife (who he refers to as his best friend.) Another thing Dr. Stavosky enjoys? His career in podiatry.

In his 35 years of experience in podiatry, Dr. Stavosky has built an impressive career focusing on wound care. Besides running his own private practice in Daly City, California, he is also the Chief of Podiatric Surgery at Seton Medical Center, the Medical Director of Wound Care at Seton Medical Center, and a Professor of Podiatric Medicine at California School of Podiatric Medicine.

How he found podiatry and how his career took surprising turns

Dr. Stavosky didn’t always know he was destined for a thriving career in wound care. He was first introduced to podiatry during graduate school at The University of the Pacific, where he worked as a student trainer. His advisor at the time “introduced me to her podiatrist, and he set me up to meet and work with some very progressive DPM’s in the area.” From there, he set on a course to study sports medicine.

Later, as a doctorate student at the California School of Podiatric Medicine, Dr. Stavosky got even more involved in the profession. “I volunteered to work on Saturday free clinics every week, and I was a TA for classes,” he says. “Plus, I attended all CME education seminars put on by CSPM—I even volunteered to work AV at those seminars.”

During his residency, even though he initially set out to work in sports medicine, Dr. Stavosky discovered his true passion was elsewhere. “I also developed an interest in foot and ankle surgery, but then found my calling in wound care,” he says.

After completing his residency, Dr. Stavosky worked in academic medicine as a volunteer until he was hired full-time as a professor. He began his career in a full-time position at the Seton Medical Center, teaching four days and tending to private patients two half-days per week.

His career took a turn for the better when he was given the opportunity to take over the wound care department. “No one else wanted to do it, but it put me on the map nationally,” he says. So, from 1987-1998, he was the Department Chair and professor at the Seton Wound Care (Medical) Center.

In 1998 Dr. Stavosky was appointed Chief of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery and opened a full-time private practice.

Board Certification

 Dr. Stavosky was a founding member of ABPM (then ABPOPPM), in 1993. Sitting for this certification was highly important to him, “first for academics, and later for medicine and wound care.”

He is also certified with ABFAS, which he pursued because he “was teaching in the surgery department at CCPM, but in the process realized just how important podiatric medicine was.” He went on to become Chair of the podiatric medical department as a result.

Although the sequence of Dr. Stavosky’s board certifications began with ABFAS, he notes “I would now do it the other way around.”, and advises his students and residents as such.

Teaching the next generation

 In addition to helping patients through his work in wound care, Dr. Stavosky notes that he’s most proud of his experience teaching.

His advice to aspiring podiatrists: “Enjoy what you do, it’s the greatest job in the world. If you don’t want to spend time in a particular facet of podiatry, such as surgery, there’s a tremendous amount elsewhere that our specialty offers, like wound care or sports medicine.”

Along with his academic position he does his best to stay involved in the podiatric community. “I volunteer as faculty for residents and students for both ABPM and ABFAS and am, or have been, on each of their Board of Directors.” He’s also on the Board of Directors at the alumni associations of the California School of Podiatric Medicine and The University of the Pacific. Plus, he lectures on wound care around the country.

What he plans to bring to ABPM

 Dr. Stavosky doesn’t take his latest honor and challenge as the Executive Director of ABPM lightly. He looks forward to “taking our organization, ABPM, to yet another level in the future.  He plans to “guide the ABPM Board of Directors and continue to grow our membership,” along with “getting even more young practitioners involved at the committee and director levels.  With our significant increases in membership, especially over the past five years, we’ve experienced a demographic shift.  We’re getting younger.”

He has ambitious plans, but if Dr. Stavosky’s career proves anything, it is that he is capable of achieving some impressive goals.

Clinical Presentation Skills: Evaluation and Management

By: Nichol Salvo, DPM

When a patient presents in any medical setting for initial evaluation, it is easy to focus on your area of specialty. That being said, having “tunnel vision” may cause you as the clinician to falter. A concerted effort must be made to consider the patient’s co-morbidities that factor into the etiology of their current lower extremity condition. How will this play into the treatment plan?

Consider the following case and the importance of whole patient consideration:

A 68 year-old male presents to the emergency department complaining of increased pain in the right foot with new onset edema and malodor. The patient indicates that pain was his initial symptom which presented approximately three days prior. The patient has a past medical history significant for DM, CKD, stage 3 lung cancer currently treated with chemotherapy, and major depressive disorder. Upon triage, the patient is noted to be febrile at 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit with all other vitals normal. The right foot is noted to have an ulceration to the right sub first metatarsal head with surrounding boggy, necrotic desquamation, heavy with foul odor. The right foot is noted with palpable pulses. The patient denies any knowledge of ulceration to the foot. Labs were obtained by ED staff and the white blood cell count is noted to be 16.1. Radiographs obtained reveal subcutaneous emphysema localized to the plantar medial and plantar central midfoot.

It is clear that an emergent incision and drainage is required to save the extremity. It is easy to get lost in the emergent conversion and transfer from ED to OR. The patient will require consent and it is discussed with the patient that given the circumstances, conservative options are not an option. However, what are the other details that must be considered with the current plan? What other questions will you need to present to your attending?

The patient is diabetic.

  1. What is the hemoglobin A1c? The patient should be advised during the time of consent whether this will impact his outcome.
  2. What is his current serum glucose? Is it elevated and must you consider a concomitant ketoacidosis?
  3. Is the patient NPO? When did the patient last eat or drink and will anesthesia have to be modified?
  4. The patient is on chemotherapy to treat his lung cancer. What are the other pertinent lab values? What are his neutrophils, platelets, hemoglobin, hematocrit, etc.? Based on this review, does the patient necessitate a type and screen in anticipation of a transfusion?
  5. Given his CKD and need for antimicrobial therapy, what is his kidney function at this time? Does your planned antibiotic regimen require renal adjustment to accommodate creatinine clearance?
  6. The patient may potentially require some level of amputation in addition to the planned incision and drainage. Is the patient’s depression managed or should mental health services be consulted to assist the patient in processing and managing the magnitude of what he is facing?
  7. Given his diabetic and malignant state, what is his nutrition status? Have you considered how to optimize his long-term healing by consideration of albumin and pre-albumin?

Having thought of these questions and their answers will not only provide a complete presentation but , also render better patient care. Considering the whole patient when treating the lower extremity is a necessary and critical component of your evaluation and management. There are almost always other things to consider.

 

Explained: Pathology Specific Biomechanical Exam Templates

By: Dr. Stephen Geller, Director, ABPM

Have you ever given someone something you thought would help only to find them using it in a completely unexpected manner? This is exactly what happened when the American Board of Podiatric Medicine provided residency directors with a full-page comprehensive biomechanical examination form. This checkbox form contained hip-to-toe measurements, both non-weight bearing and weight bearing, and in gait. The unexpected outcome was that these forms separated biomechanical examinations from the physical examination performed for most complaints. In reviewing these forms at residency on-site evaluations, there were inadequacies that led to misinterpretations of the examination findings or lack of supporting documentation for the given diagnosis.

CPME 320: Standards and Requirements for Approval of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery Residencies, (the document governing residency programs) contains multiple MAVs, including biomechanical examinations. These biomechanical cases are defined as: “…direct participation of the resident in the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of diseases, disorders, and injuries of the foot, ankle, and their governing and related structures by biomechanical means. These experiences include, but are not limited to, performing comprehensive lower extremity biomechanical examinations and gait analyses, comprehending the processes related to these examinations, and understanding the techniques and interpretations of gait evaluations of neurologic and pathomechanical disorders.” At no point does this definition state that a biomechanical examination is from the hip to the toe.

Patient’s present with a specific complaint and not all pathology requires a hip-to-toe examination to be comprehensive relative to the causative factors. Residency training is to impart advanced knowledge so that when in practice, the graduated resident will be able to perform pertinent aspects of the biomechanical examination and identify all contributing factors. This information is used to minimize risk of complications in plan of care. First year residents will be less familiar with the presenting pathology and require more guidance through a more thorough exam to identify those causative factors. A senior resident may require less guidance and identifies all causative factors much faster.

With the development of electronic medical records (EMR), the use of forms that are separate from the electronic documents is increasingly difficult. To bring the biomechanical examination into the physical examination where it belongs, EMR templates for pathology specific biomechanical examinations have been created. These templates consist of: Pes Planus; Pes Cavus; Hallux Valgus; Hammertoe, Lesser Metatarsal and Intermetatarsal Pain; and Proximal Examination. The templates are modular being combined to comprehensively evaluate the pathomechanics of a specific patient. For example, a patient complaining of neuroma symptoms with a low arch would begin with the Pes Planus template and where indicated insert the template for Hammertoe, Lesser Metatarsal, and Intermetatarsal Pain. If at the completion of this examination the findings do not fully explain the pathomechanics of the foot, then the Proximal Examination template is added.

 

Meet ABPM Director, Stephen Geller, DPM

Stephen Geller, DPM

Stephen Geller, DPM

Dr. Geller has been a Diplomate of the ABPM since 1997, and a board director since 2015.  He currently serves on the ABPM Examination Committee as sub-section Chair for the Qualification examination, and has been a committee member since 2008.  In fact, the ABPM App originated from the qualification examination committee under Dr. Geller, when a style guide and item writing manual were created for consistency in our examination processes. Dr Geller’s hard work with ABPM is also highlighted in the new pathology specific biomechanical exam templates now available through ABPM.

I am proud of the accomplishments ABPM has made in a short time. The importance of medicine in daily practice cannot be emphasized enough. In my opinion, Podiatrists need to be the best physicians in the hospital. I think it’s part of our training to listen carefully and examine thoroughly, putting us in a position to make diagnoses before other physicians get to see the patient. “

Dr. Geller has also served as an ABPM representative to the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) Residency Review Committee (RRC) for two terms, remaining as an at-large member of the RRC. He is an ABPM representative to the Collaborative Residency Evaluator Committee (CREC) and is a residency program evaluator for the ABPM, ABFAS, and CPME.  Dr. Geller holds clinical appointments at many of the colleges of podiatric medicine and is a past president of the Arizona Podiatric Medical Association.  Dr. Geller earned his Master’s Degree in Medical Education and completed a 13-year tenure as the founding Director of Podiatric Medication Education at Maricopa Medical Center in Phoenix, AZ.  His clinical practice has been recognized in Phoenix Magazine’s “Top Docs”, as well as one of “America’s Top Podiatrists” by the American Research Council.

Clinical Presentation Skills: History of Present Illness

By: Stephen Geller, DPM

Have you ever stepped in a hole and twisted your ankle? Well I recently had a 27-year-old female who was otherwise healthy accept for right ankle pain 3-weeks after a similar inversion injury. No other part of her foot or leg hurts. Her pain is sharp, graded 6/10, localized to the anterolateral ankle without radiation. Standing and walking aggravates the pain and there is still residual swelling and bruising in the area. Improvement has been noted with ice, rest, and ace wrap. She has no prior history of ankle injuries.

Presenting a case is no different than telling a story. Granted, storytelling is an artform itself, but if you can become a good story teller, your attendings will remember you and your medical records will stand out from the rest. In medicine it has become acceptable to use poor grammar, run-on sentences, and be plain old boring. It doesn’t have to be that way. I bring up documentation here because your presentation should reflect your note.

‘A 27-year-old female presents for right ankle pain. The patient states that she stepped in a hole 3-weeks-ago suffering inversion injury. The patient states that her pain is sharp. The patient grades her pain as 6/10. The patient states that her pain is localized to the anterolateral ankle. The patient states that walking and standing aggravate her pain. The patient notes that swelling and bruising remain. The patient denies prior ankle injuries or pain in other areas of her foot or leg. The patient has attempted self-treatment using ice, rest, compression in ace wrap without relief.’

Compare the two presentations. Which one do you think would catch your attention and keep you attentive for the rest of the complaint?

Story telling begins with a hook. You need something to grab your attending’s attention so that they will remain attentive throughout the rest of your presentation. One sentence that conveys the story that is to follow.

“Excuse me Dr. Jones, but my patient has a severely infected diabetic foot ulcer that will need admitting”. Ok, that one is easy. Everyone is going to pay attention as soon as you say severely infected and need admitting. Still you have cleared a path to tell the rest of the medical history.

“Mr. Smith returns for a noninfected venous leg ulcer fifty percent improved from last week”. Here is a rather mundane medical issue. The patient is doing fine and just returning for follow up care. It’s the 50% improvement that will grab the listener’s attention, so you can go on with the rather routine presentation.

Once you have your audience hooked, you must tell the story. If it were a real story you would want to demonstrate a personal tie to the problem or evoke an emotional response. Let’s face it, in medicine that is frowned upon. What your audience is listening for in medicine is the information needed to make the diagnosis. This is where you will demonstrate your medical knowledge. Regardless of which pneumonic you prefer, NLDOCAT or OPQRST, you can still make it more interesting. Success at this level will require a thorough understanding of the differential diagnosis, end-organ effects of systemic illnesses, and complications of prior treatments.

‘You know how you say that heel pain isn’t always plantar fasciitis? Well Ms. Johnson is here for left heel pain, but it’s not typical. One-week ago she began a new exercise program and developed 8/10 sharp shooting pain in the plantar left heel. No known injury is reported. This pain radiates posterior to the medial malleolus, up her calf, thigh and to the hip. She doesn’t have to be active to experience pain and there is no relation to time of day or shoe gear. Ms. Johnson has a history of low back pain but has never been worked up for this complaint. No history of joint swelling or stiffness anywhere in her body is reported. Since the heel pain began there has been no progression and slight improvement treating with ice, stretching, ibuprofen, and cessation of exercise.’

Heel pain is one of the most common complaints we see. The differential includes plantar fasciitis, nerve entrapment in the foot, tarsal tunnel, radiculopathy, systemic arthropathy, stress fracture, etc. The above history takes the listener through the differential diagnosis as told by somewhat of a story. There is enough information to have a pretty good idea of what you will find in the exam.

This is presentation of a history of present illness. If you become good at telling the patient’s story everything will flow. Apply this practice to your notes as well. Obviously, there is less leeway for a casual introduction to hook the reader but convey the information in full sentences. Try to start each sentence with a new subject such as pain, onset, treatment. It is not acceptable to begin each sentence with “the patient states…” This is the history, so it is assumed that anything in quotations is exactly what the patient states.

 

Marathon Anyone? A Practice Profile: Katherine Dux, DPM

Katherine Dux, DPM

Katherine Dux, DPM

When your podiatrist decides to run a marathon just to understand the possible injuries better, you know they are passionate about their profession. Meet Dr. Katherine Dux.

“I was a volunteer at the Chicago Marathon for several years and I had patients that would come in with concerns after training or running a marathon,” explained Dux. “And while I had been to probably every different boutique fitness class in the Chicago area, and was active, I had never run a marathon. I thought, I can do this. “I always want to better understand how my patients get injured or the pain they are experiencing, so I can provide the best care. It helps me understand the shoes, the warm-ups, the training and overall movement. Running a marathon made sense.”

How the passion started and where it took her

Dr. Dux was first drawn to podiatry when she was 17 years old. “I had bunion treatment at that time and truly enjoyed the experience I had with the podiatrist and his office. I ended up working there in high school through my second year of college. I was able to get a good sense of the profession, shadow the doctor and see the real day-in-the-life of a podiatrist.”

Dr. Dux attended Loyola University as an undergraduate and podiatry school at Dr. William M. Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine.  “I am from the Midwest and so after undergraduate and podiatry school, I thought I wanted to venture out west. Yet I felt so at home as a student rotating through the Loyola/Hines program, and so enjoyed teaching junior residents, I jokingly told my mentor and residency director, Dr. Ron Sage, I never wanted to graduate residency, so I wouldn’t have to leave the Loyola program,” said Dux.

As luck would have it, during Dr. Dux’s senior year, a position opened for an attending podiatrist at Loyola and she was hired just two weeks after completing her residency. “It was quite the transition from being a resident to an attending, but I have enjoyed every minute of it over the past seven years!”

Dr. Dux is currently an attending podiatrist and assistant professor with the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation at Loyola University Medical Center where she also did her residency. She is also a consultant to the Department of Surgery, Division of Podiatry at the Hines VA.

Getting and staying involved

During podiatry school Dr. Dux continued to work for the podiatrist on holidays and breaks and became involved with as many student organizations as possible. She was Vice President of the Illinois Podiatric Medical Association and planned the annual midwinter seminar at the Rosalind Franklin University. She was also involved with the APMA at Scholl College and attended the APMA meeting in Florida during her third year. “My involvement in the different organizations enabled me to meet many practicing podiatrists and learn about different aspects of podiatry,” explained Dux.

Dr. Dux continues to remain active in her profession. She is a member of the Annual Scientific Conference Committee for ACFAS and the Cognitive Exam Committee for the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgery. She is a journal reviewer for JFAS, judge for the International Post-Graduate Research Symposium at the Midwest Podiatry Conference, on the Rapid Response Committee and an Ambassador for ABPM. She encourages residents and especially young practitioners to get involved. “Use every moment, especially as a resident, to experience, learn and grow. Involve yourself in your profession – especially in your areas of interest both so you learn what you like, and you meet mentors to help you in developing as a professional.”

Board certification

Dr. Dux is dual board certified in medicine and surgery. “I sat for the ABPM board in 2012, the last year case submissions were mandatory. This required a lot of work but was a learning experience because it required me to review some of my first cases as a practicing podiatrist. The ABPM certification has been invaluable to me. It has allowed me to gain staff privileges at multiple facilities and has provided proof to my patients that I hold certification in the specialty of medicine. I think it is essential for all podiatrists to demonstrate their knowledge of the medical aspect as a foundational certification. The ABPM certification shows I know medicine and biomechanics and will look for the best ways to treat patients conservatively first. I am also certified with ABFAS. I am a huge proponent of achieving both credentials because it shows your patients you care about and are well-versed in primary podiatric medicine and podiatric surgery.”

Creating balance

Dr. Dux also believes in creating balance. While she is passionate about her work, she reminds residents especially, to remember to pursue other personal interests in addition to your profession. “Make time for yourself, your family and your friends – it will make you a better practitioner,” she explains. In addition to exercise, Dr. Dux can be found working on her golf game, learning about and collecting wine and traveling internationally – especially France.  As for that marathon, Dr. Dux says she learned a great deal training for, and participating, but she confesses, “I probably won’t do it again any time soon.”

 

Fellowship Overview with Timothy Ford, DPM

Timothy Ford, DPM

Timothy Ford, DPM

Reconstructive Foot and Diabetic Limb Salvage/Preservation Fellowship

Sponsoring Institutions: KentuckyOne Health Jewish Hospital and University of Louisville

 In continuing our series about CPME-approved residencies and fellowships, this month we are featuring a one-year reconstructive foot and diabetic limb salvage/preservation fellowship at KentuckyOne Health and the University of Louisville.  Below are insights about the program from Director, Timothy Ford, DPM.

 

ABPM: What are some key aspects of this fellowship?

Dr. Ford: This program is a mix of surgery and medicine – it offers the best of both worlds. Unlike being on one service, podiatry, our fellows are on a variety of services throughout their 12 months. These rotations include plastic surgery, ortho trauma, infectious disease, foot & ankle clinic and our fellows also take ER call at University of Louisville.

This fellowship offers a wide range of experiences, but it can also be customized. If our fellow is interested in a particular area, we work with them to ensure they get a little more time on that rotation. For instance, if a fellow is really interested in traumatology, we’ll give them a few more months on that service, and make sure the attending in that area is working closely with them.

Of course, there are certain requirements that must be met for a CPME approved fellowship. So, all our fellows have to complete ortho trauma, and plastic surgery rotations. In addition, they must take a micro vascular course and cover foot clinic. Otherwise, there is room to mold the experience.

ABPM: What sets this fellowship apart?

Dr. Ford: We think of our fellows as junior attendings. They are given a lot of autonomy, although there is always an attending nearby. This program is especially great for those who get out of residency and don’t feel that they have quite enough experience, or just want to learn a little more. Our fellows leave with at least a couple hundred procedures. This program forces fellows to grow a little more and gives them an opportunity to do things on their own. But at the same time, attendings are always there and available.

Also, because our fellows work with fellows in different medical subspecialties, there is an increased awareness of podiatry, and it builds a better understanding and respect for our medical specialty.

ABPM: What are the research requirements for this fellowship?

Dr. Ford: Research is encouraged, and there are a lot of research opportunities through the university that fellows can tap into. We also encourage fellows to partner in a research project with a first-year resident, who can continue the research.

While we don’t have strict research requirements, research is important for all podiatrists because it gives you a different perspective; it shows you how medicine evolves.

ABPM: Who is the ideal candidate for this fellowship? What are you looking for?

Dr. Ford: In general, CPME-approved fellowships are great for those interested in academic medicine, or those who don’t feel they got enough experience through their residency.

On paper, we’re looking for the same things as everyone else – good PRR logs, involvement in extra curricular activities, etc. But when it comes to the interview, we are looking for someone eager to learn and who can rise to the occasion. This fellowship is attached to a residency program, so our fellows get a lot of calls from residents – they become teachers. A good candidate for this fellowship won’t shy away from that aspect.

Most importantly, we’re looking for a candidate who knows what they are lacking and how this experience can fill that gap.

ABPM: What else do potential candidates need to know?

Dr. Ford: We send out a notice to all residency programs right after Labor Day. Applications should be submitted by the end of the year.  But we do encourage interested residents to contact us anytime.

Also, because you’re required to be licensed by the state of Kentucky before you can start the fellowship, it’s important you plan ahead. The state exam is normally in April or May.

As dual-boarded DPM in academic medicine, do you have any other words of wisdom?

As insurance becomes more and more important, credentials will become more and more important. So, get dual-boarded. Get the extra wound care certification offered by ABPM. Get certified in whatever you can! In my opinion, it’s easiest to do all this right after residency, when everything is fresh in your mind. Sit for all of it – one right after the other.

 

For additional information about this fellowship, visit http://www.kentuckyonehealth.org/fellowship-opportunities-podiatry-program

Interested Podiatrists may contact Dr. Timothy Ford, Fellowship Director at tcford03@louisville.edu

If you have or know of a CPME fellowship program that you would like featured in this series, please email admin@ABPMed.org

Dr. Steve Goldman Testifies before VA House Committee, Subcommittee on Health

 GoldmanWashington, D.C. On May 2, at 2:00 p.m. ET American Board of Podiatric Medicine (ABPM) President Steve Goldman, DPM, testified before the VA House Committee, Subcommittee on Health about key legislation that would help to address ongoing delays in access to quality care at the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).

The VA Provider Equity Act (HR-1058) would benefit our nation’s veterans through improved, ongoing recruitment and retention of podiatric physicians in the VHA and would ensure sufficient experienced podiatric physicians are available to treat patients with lower extremity needs.

“This bill reflects significant advancement in the education, training, and licensure requirements for podiatric physicians over the past 40 years,” said Dr. Goldman. “Podiatrists deserve parity within the VHA, and our patients deserve the proven benefits of the best-trained experts in lower extremity care as part of their health care team.”

There is overwhelming support from VA chiefs of staff and chief medical officers for a legislative remedy to include DPMs in the Physician and Dentist Pay Authority. For more information on the bill, please visit the ABPM or APMA websites.

“The number of disabled veterans enrolled in the VHA is increasing, and they have more comorbidity and more psychosocial and socioeconomic issues than non-veterans,” said APMA President Ira H. Kraus, DPM. “We need to do better in serving this vulnerable and deserving population.”

Dr. Goldman was one of several physicians asked to speak on behalf of podiatrists. Others included: Jeffrey Robbins, DPM, Director of the Veterans Health Administration Headquarters Podiatry Services and Chief of the Podiatry Section at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, and Seth Rubenstein, DPM, APMA treasurer.

The American Board of Podiatric Medicine (ABPM) is the only board recognized by the Joint Committee on the Recognition of Specialty Boards (JCRSB) to certify in podiatric orthopedics and primary podiatric medicine, the specialty area that represents a significant portion of care in most podiatric practices.  Established in 1978, ABPM strives to protect the health and welfare of the public through this ongoing process of evaluation and podiatric certification, providing trusted validation of expertise to hospitals, credentialing bodies and insurance panels.  For more information please visit www.ABPMed.org .

The American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) is the nation’s leading professional organization for today’s podiatrists. Doctors of Podiatric Medicine (DPMs) are qualified by their education, training, and experience to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle, and structures of the leg. APMA has 53 state component locations across the United States and its territories, with a membership of nearly 13,000 podiatrists. All practicing APMA members are licensed by the state in which they practice podiatric medicine. For more information, visit www.apma.org .

See Dr. Goldman speak about his testimony here: Video (70MB .mov)

Please click here to see a full list of witnesses and the video of this testimony.

ABPM Diplomate, Dr. H. John Visser, is Guest Lecturer and Presenter in Sweden

H. John Visser, DPM

H. John Visser, DPM

John Visser, DPM, Director of the SSM DePaul Residency Program in St. Louis, MO just returned from a week-long stay overseas where he was a distinguished guest lecturer and instructor at the Foot & Ankle techniques course in Gothenburg, Sweden. The course was held at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital, and his topics included new techniques in hallux valgus, Lisfranc dislocation, and Charcot neuroarthropathy reconstruction.

Lecturers for the course represented the countries of Sweden and Germany, with Dr. Visser being the only American distinguished lecturer and presenter. Visser was also recently inducted into the German Society of Foot and Ankle Surgery in 2016 where he also presented in front of an audience of more than four hundred professionals in Munich, Germany.

Dr. H. John Visser has been an ABPM Diplomate since 1989.

Source: PM News, Online

Fellowship Opportunity at the University of Michigan

Insights from Dr. Michael Munson, Assistant Professor Internal Medicine and Fellowship Program Director

Fellowship applications due: November 1, 2016 – contact Dr. Michael Munson for info at Munsonm@umich.edu

Over the last couple of years, the ABPM has featured the career paths of different podiatrists in our Practice Profiles section of our Residents newsletter.   While we will resume those profiles in future issues, we have been asked by many residents and members to also profile different CPME approved fellowship programs.   As more podiatrist consider pursuing careers at academic health centers or simply want to expand their knowledge in a concentrated area, there seems to be an increased interest in fellowships.

With this October issue, we launch a series of articles where you will get an in-depth understanding of a few different CPME approved residencies.  This month we focus on a research fellowship in limb preservation, wound care and diabetic lower extremity complications at the University of Michigan Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes (MEND) in Ann Arbor, Michigan    This CPME fellowship is a two-year program designed to train podiatrists interested in a career in research, teaching, clinical medicine and surgery.

“The educational opportunities in this program are quite rare. We are aware of only a few training programs of this kind that seeks to produce highly trained wound care and limb preservation experts in academic medicine while also providing the fellow the opportunity to acquire the necessary skills for statistical analysis and research design. This new program would take advantage of the unique background and training of our podiatric physicians, our relationship with MEND and the Comprehensive Diabetes Center, as well as the University of Michigan Wound Care Center. We need to train new physicians in wound care and limb preservation to coordinate care in this multidisciplinary specialty.”

What are some key aspects of this Fellowship?

“While our focus is limb preservation, we will expose the fellow to a full spectrum of lower extremity pathology in clinic.” Some of the key areas include:

  • Neuropathy: “We have the unique opportunity to have the fellow train for 2-4 weeks in our neuropathy clinic with one of the world’s leading experts in neuropathy. As many podiatrists learn shortly after residency, we are on the front lines of treating painful peripheral neuropathy.  While we get some exposure in residency, it is our goal to provide our fellows the additional training needed to be an expert in the field of peripheral neuropathy.”
  • Limb salvage: “In addition to clinical and surgical podiatry, our fellows will get the chance to spend time with expert pedorthists and orthotists fabricating and adjusting braces and orthotic devices. Further, the fellow can also work with our ID specialists on our population at risk for limb loss.  “
  • Research: “This fellowship will likely be the only time in one’s career that they have the opportunity to write and conduct research with the benefit of six months of dedicated, protected time. Our research directors, James Wrobel, DPM a leading podiatric author, and Rodica Busui, MD, an endocrinologist, and the leading expert internationally in understanding the mechanisms of diabetic complications, particularly of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, will provide expert guidance. The University of Michigan has near limitless support for those who desire to publish their work. Researchers at University of Michigan have access to world-class facilities and services, comprehensive grant administration support and a variety of other resources. Our division, and indeed our entire university, provides opportunity to collaborate with world class faculty on research projects.”

How are candidates selected? What do you look for?

“While we are generally recruiting recent and current residents, we are open to accepting applications from anyone who is interested in a career in academic medicine.  Ideally, we are looking for someone who desires a lifelong career of clinical medicine, surgery, teaching, and research.  I believe this is most easily accomplished in a medical school or academic institution. The University of Michigan is ranked as the #1 public University for research, and as such offers a great deal of opportunities for support and collaboration on research projects. As post graduate training in Podiatry is new to our University, we want someone who will represent us proudly.”

“Podiatric physicians already receive training in internal medicine, infectious disease, vascular medicine, surgery, preventative diabetic foot care and wound care in their three years of residency. They are ideally suited to expand on this knowledge through fellowship training to become a highly-trained specialist in this field. This also serves to help expand the evidence base and produce more research-minded clinicians and clinician-educators.”

Interested Podiatrists may contact Dr. Michael Munson, Fellowship Director at Munsonm@umich.edu   Deadline is November 1, 2016.

NEXT ISSUE:  Additional insights in the U of M program.  Why the ABPM credential was selected as the certification of choice for University of Michigan fellowship staff. Thoughts on the increased interest in wound care and limb salvage.    If you have or know of a CPME fellowship program that you would like featured, please email admin@abpmed.org.

 

 

 

The American Board of Podiatric Medicine
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